Wednesday, 2 January 2013

Sepia Saturday 158 ... i-Spy

Firstly a big HAPPY NEW YEAR to everyone and welcome to my first vintage books and magazines blog post of 2013. Although this blog post is an entry for the current Sepia Saturday, I am not theming this week. Instead I have selected a few pictures from one of a small collection of I-SPY books I picked up when I was Christmas shopping a few weeks ago. I remember having several of these as a kid but alas they are long gone. For anyone not familiar with I-SPY books, they are pocket-size publications covering various locations and subjects, e.g. the street, the farm, pets, butterflies, etc., where the spotter was rewarded with points for spotting various things. I think my favourite as a child was called I-SPY on the Road which kept me from boredom on long car journeys. However, the one I have chosen to share today is called I-SPY in the Street. I particularly like the "Playing on Sundays is Forbidden" sign.

I-SPY in the Street

 I-SPY in the Street

 I-SPY in the Street, front cover
 I-SPY in the Street, back cover

What struck me about this book was the simplicity and innocence, which is definitely lost in many modern childhoods. It also made me wonder what an equivalent I-SPY in the Street book would include in today's world ... 5 points graffiti, 5 points for fast-food chain litter, 10 points for broken glass, and 20 points for a boarded-up show window perhaps. Although with all the gadgets and devices available now, I suspect many no longer even look further than their handheld device.

As usual, more vintage books and magazines and vintage postcards on my web site

    

12 comments:

  1. "No Playing On A Sunday" ! Quite Right Too!! Although It Does Beg Many Questions.........

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  2. What a fun post! Those books sound quite fun, especially to keep kids occupied on car rides, as you suggested.

    Perhaps the kids today could play I-Spy on their handheld gadgets. :)

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  3. Those books look both fun and educational.

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  4. My friends and I played "I Spy" all the time...it was a big favorite. The game probably helped develop one's observational skills.

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  5. I do remember those I Spy books so well, and it was a brilliant idea. I can't think of anything similar these days, which is a shame.

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  6. I don't know those particular "I Spy" books, but there are several "I Spy" books still around in a modern form. I bought them when my girls were little and every Christmas I bring them out and we go through them again. My daughter bought one this past Christmas for a little girl.

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  7. I never saw an I-Spy book; I guess today's children would just use a smart phone or some such gadget. I did make a 'quiz' sheet for our village as something to amuse our grandchildren a few years ago - but they weren't interested.

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  8. I kind of remember that name as well, even though the photos and such didn't bring much to mind. But this was excellent, very interesting! Thanks.

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  9. I've seen several modern versions of "I Spy" books. They aren't of streets though. More pages of photographs of things like marbles and you have to find certain kinds. Then there are, or were the "Where's Waldo" books. I remember telling my grandkids they'd be in bad shape if they had to find their way back from wherever we were going because they never looked out of the car window.

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  10. A fun book and quite British. But I think this is the game many of us play on Sepia Saturday each week. I spy some little detail in an old photo, and Voila! There's Uncle Waldo hidden behind the fern stand!

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  11. I fear you are correct. Even worse, I imagine there are just as many parents in the cars not talking to their kids as they too spend far too much time staring at stupid consumer devices. These look like wonderful books. I would have loved them as a kid.

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  12. These are fun books. And I like what Mike said about us playing I Spy each week with the prompts. That's exactly what it is. What do I spy in the photo that is like something else I know/have seen?

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